About the Author:

The average sentiment for the articles processed so far:

Anger: Red
Disgust: Olive
Fear: Green
Joy: Gold
Sadness: Blue
View Post

YouTube’s Ad Problems Finally Blow Up in Google’s Face

In Business, Events, Government, Legal, Start Up by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , ,

Late last year, Israel-based entrepreneur Matan Uziel saw a notification he’d never seen before pop up on YouTube’s backend—the part of the site where creators upload their videos. “I saw a yellow dollar sign. At first I didn’t understand what it was,” Uziel says. “Then I moved my cursor over it. I saw it meant my video was not advertiser-friendly.” By then, Uziel had made and posted close to a dozen videos to a YouTube channel called Real Women Real Stories—women speaking frankly into a camera about their experiences of sexual abuse. The view counts on some of the videos had climbed into the thousands, qualifying them for pre-roll ads placed through YouTube’s advertising program. They were bringing Uziel and …

View Post

Space Photos of the Week: Codependent Spiral Galaxies Dunno Who They Are Anymore

In Government, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , ,

Few things in the solar system capture the imagination quite like the rings of Saturn. Countless pieces of ice and rock orbit the system’s second-largest planet, and the Cassini probe sent back a beautiful closeup taken from just 70,000 miles away. Peering further into the cosmos, the Hubble Space Telescope snapped an amazing photograph of the Whirlpool Galaxy, flecked with blue and spinning like a Frisbee through the Horologium, or pendulum clock, constellation 50 million miles away. Look closely and you can see the spiral arms reaching out from the galaxy’s core. The Hubble also captured a supermassive black hole with the mass of 1 billion suns some 8 billion light-years away. Astronomers suspect the black hole was ejected from …

View Post

Security News This Week: FedEx Offered Customers Five Bucks to Re-Install Flash

In Business, Government, Mobile Technology, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , , ,

As so many of them have been lately, it was a wild week in security. Monday, FBI Director James Comey confirmed that an ongoing investigation into the Trump campaign’s ties to Russia began last July. The GOP responded minutes later by charging hard against—leaks. That really set the tone! House Intelligence Committee chairman Devin Nunes added some misplaced intrigue by suggesting Trump or his associates had been caught up in surveillance, which isn’t what it sounds like. But speaking of election hacking, Google packaged together some critical tools to help safeguard the vote digitally around the world. The company’s also made strides in Android security, although half of all Android devices didn’t get a security update in 2016, so there …

View Post

Meet the Woman Who Can See With Her Ears

In Education, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords:

The last thing twenty-one-year-old Pat Fletcher saw before the explosion was the chemical-filled steel tank beside her suddenly ballooning outward. With alarm she realized the plastic hose in her hand had grown unusually hot. Then the world flashed blindingly bright and turned a brilliant blue, the color of the flames engulfing her body. When she awoke, Pat thought she might be dreaming. The world around her was featureless and dark, as though she were lost in a gray, smoky fog. The sedatives and painkillers had something to do with it, as did the fact that her face was swathed in thick bandages. But soon a solemn doctor arrived at her bedside. And Pat learned there was something more. She had …

View Post

It’s Hard Out Here For a Pigeon

In Government, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords:

The first scene in “Cities,” the final episode of Planet Earth II, looks like a chase scene out of a James Bond movie. But instead of Daniel Craig, you’ve got a bunch of fighting langurs battling high above the city of Jodhpur, India. The music thumps, the camera soars, and if you watch on a big enough screen, it feels like you’re leaping from rooftops alongside them. “Cities” represents a new sort of endeavor for the Planet Earth team. Their latest study of animals looks at how cities change and shape animals, how animals survive (or don’t) in urban environments, and how humans can improve the relationship. It’s thrilling and touching, and features a surprising amount of turtle gore. We continue our ongoing coverage of this wonderful series, we …

View Post

Hate to Break It to Steve Mnuchin, But AI’s Already Taking Jobs

In Business, Education, Emerging Technology, Government, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , ,

Today, in 2017, the president’s top economic advisor said he had no worries about robots putting people out of work. “In terms of artificial intelligence taking over the jobs, I think we’re so far away from that that it’s not even on my radar screen,” Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin told an audience in Washington. “I think it’s 50 or 100 more years.” Great! That’s a relief! President Trump can go back to horsing around on his big rig confident in the knowledge self-driving trucks won’t replace millions of drivers in a few years. Except Mnuchin’s wrong. Like super-wrong. Artificial intelligence is not only coming for jobs, the jobs it’s coming for are the precious few left over after old-school automation …

View Post

Science Proves Trump’s Health Care Vote Ultimatum Was Never Going to Work

In Business, Education, Finance, Government, Healthcare by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , ,

President Donald Trump, who quite literally wrote the book on the art of the deal, has lost the first major negotiation of his presidency over the American Health Care Act. And it was his final strategic move that may have pushed the bill over the cliff. After tense negotiations with the House Freedom Caucus over the particulars of the bill Thursday, Trump called for an end to the bargaining and issued the reticent Republicans an ultimatum: Pass this bill, or Obamacare stays. “At some point, you either have a deal or you don’t,” said press secretary Sean Spicer Friday, explaining the president’s state of mind. Around the same time Spicer was briefing the press, House Speaker Paul Ryan rushed to …

View Post

How Can You Measure How Much Pain a Baby Feels?

In Education, Events, Government, Healthcare by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords:

When a baby is born early, their first months of life can be hectic and painful. Doctors can implant breathing tubes, and perform multiple surgeries as the baby’s young organs continue developing. Up until the ’80s though, one major element of that hospital experience was missing: pain medication and anesthesia. Preemies undergoing open heart surgery might receive a paralytic, but no more, because doctors believed that newborns either couldn’t feel pain or didn’t remember it. Clinicians’ practice flipped in the late ’80s after a key review paper compiled the overwhelming evidence of physiological traces of pain, and today preemies get anesthesia and opioids just like any other patient. But that practice just got more complicated. In December, the FDA mandated …

View Post

Photo of the Week: Scientists Fire Up the World’s Largest Artificial Sun (Without Melting Earth)

In Emerging Technology, Government by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

If you’ve ever used a magnifying glass to, say, fry an ant under the summer sun, you have a general idea of what the Synlight solar simulator does. The enormous machine, which looks like an insect’s eye, uses 149 lamps to simulate sunlight, making it a handy tool for testing things like solar panels or generating clean energy. Scientists threw the switch on the world’s largest artificial sun on Thursday, which happened to be the birthday of the fellow who designed it. “I had tears in my eyes today,” says project manager Kai Wieghardt of the German Aerospace Center. “It’s my baby, and it’s really the first time in my life that something I drew in my notebooks has been …

View Post

Tech Bigwigs Know How Addictive Their Products Are. Why Don’t the Rest of Us?

In Business, Education, Gaming, Government, Healthcare, Science & Nature, Start Up by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , , ,

In late 2010, Steve Jobs told New York Times journalist Nick Bilton that his children had never used the iPad. “We limit how much technology our kids use in the home.” Bilton discovered that other tech giants imposed similar restrictions. Chris Anderson, the former editor of WIRED, enforced strict time limits on every device in his home, “because we have seen the dangers of technology firsthand.” His five children were never allowed to use screens in their bedrooms. Evan Williams, a founder of Blogger, Twitter, and Medium, bought hundreds of books for his two young sons, but refused to give them an iPad. And Lesley Gold, the founder of an analytics company, imposed a strict no-screen-time-during-the-week rule on her kids. …

View Post

The Journey of NASA’s Smartest Satellite Finally Comes to an End

In Government, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , ,

NASA’s highly experimental Earth Observing-1 satellite mission was supposed to last just a year. It did that, and then survived 16 more—all the while testing NASA’s riskiest, oddball ideas. It’s been a proving ground for everything from multi- and hyperspectral imagers, to a self-piloting AI. But EO-1 is finally out of fuel, and at the end of the month the craft’s operating team will close up shop. Already out of fuel, EO-1 itself will continue to slowly shuffle off its orbital coil until it burns up in Earth’s atmosphere. Such is the life of an expendable spacecraft. And while that may make EO-1’s team a little misty eyed, funding these high risk, ¯_(ツ)_/¯—reward missions—and letting them thrive or burn up as they …

View Post

Facebook Messenger Finally Makes Group Chat Not a Total Hassle

In Business, Government by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

For all its virtues, Facebook Messenger works more like email than a group messaging app like GroupMe or Tango. If you want to talk with someone directly, no problem. But it hasn’t handled large groups effectively because it lacked some of the key elements that make group messaging fun. It was too simple. A pair of new features, called Reactions and Mentions, constitute part of Facebook’s bid to make Messenger more inclusive. You already know Reactions as the tool that lets you comment on status updates with a broader range of emotions than a simple thumbs up or down. Now that functionality comes to Messenger, letting you choose one of seven pre-baked replies for those times that you’re too busy or too lazy …

View Post
Number of Items Identified: 7
Item #Item NameScoreItem Classification
1celebrity0.677person, adult, celebrity
2adult0.679
3person0.68
4flag0.665
5orange color0.957
6yellow color0.698

Silicon Valley Would Rather Cure Death Than Make Life Worth Living

In Business, Education, Emerging Technology, Government, Healthcare, Science & Nature, Start Up by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , ,

Silicon Valley is coming for death. But it’s looking in the wrong place. After disrupting the way we love, communicate, travel, work, and even eat, technologists believe they can solve the ultimate problem. Perennially youthful Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan announced last year a $3 billion initiative to obliterate human disease. Among his many crusades, Paypal co-founder and Trump advisor Peter Thiel aims to end mortality. (“Basically, I’m against it,” he has said.) Alphabet has a whole company devoted to curing this most intractable of inconveniences. And they aren’t necessarily crazy to try. Since the 19th century, average life expectancies have risen for everyone (though not at equal rates) thanks to advances in science and technology. …

View Post

Instagram Has Two-Factor Authentication Now, So Turn It On

In Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords:

Because you care greatly about your personal security hygiene, you’ve already enlisted two-factor authentication to help protect most of your online accounts. That’s good! Instagram, though, hasn’t given you the option. That changes today. Go get it. While Instagram had made two-factor available to a select group of users previously, the extra layer of protection is now available to all, meaning you, meaning it’s time to fiddle with some settings. In the app, head to your profile page, tap on the three-dot icon in the upper-right corner, and then tap Two-Factor Authentication. Toggle the Require Security Code option, select Turn On. Instagram Instagram will then send you text with a six-digit code to make sure it’s really you making the …

View Post

WikiLeaks Shows How the CIA Can Hack a Mac’s Hidden Code

In Business, Government, Mobile Technology, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , ,

If the CIA wants inside your Mac, it may not matter that you so carefully avoided those infected email attachments or maliciously crafted web sites designed to plant spyware on your machine. Based on new documents in WikiLeaks’ ongoing release of CIA hacking secrets, hackers at Langley could have infected the deepest, most hidden recesses of your laptop. A new installment of leaks from WikiLeaks’ so-called Vault 7 cache of secret CIA documents published Thursday hints at the ultra-stealthy techniques the agency has used to spy on the laptops—and possibly smartphones—of Apple users when it can get physical access to those machines. The documents show how the CIA’s spyware infects corners of a computer’s code that antivirus scanners and even …

View Post

Somebody Just Buy the ISS Already

In Business, Education, Government, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , ,

Two hundred and twenty miles above Earth flies the International Space Station, a $70 billion1 engineering marvel that no one has any idea what to do with. Short term, sure: astronauts, science, zero-gravity viral videos. Longer term, spending $3 billion to $4 billion annually to keep the ISS running conflicts with NASA’s other ambitions, like visiting Mars. Congress holds NASA’s purse strings, so ultimately the decision lies with that august body. Yesterday, a congressional subcommittee heard four space experts testify on the relative merits of saving vs. scrapping the space station (or at least, the US portion of it). The hearing yielded few new insights. But there’s one simple answer that no one at the meeting really discussed: Sell the ISS to someone …

View Post

The Clever ‘DoubleAgent’ Attack Turns Antivirus Into Malware

In Business, Education, Events, Government, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , ,

Your antivirus software might come with some annoyances. It might slow your computer down, or pop up so many alerts that you can’t tell when something is actually wrong. But researchers have discovered a more sinister downside: A well-intentioned debugging tool found in many versions of Microsoft Windows can be used maliciously to gain access to vulnerable antivirus programs, and weaponize them. Discovered by researchers at the Israeli cybersecurity defense firm Cybellum, the so-called “DoubleAgent attack” takes advantage of the Microsoft Application Verifier, a tool used for strengthening security in third-party Windows applications, to inject customized code into programs. The approach could potentially manipulate any software target, but antivirus programs would be particularly appealing to an attacker since they have …

View Post

The Battle for Top AI Talent Only Gets Tougher From Here

In Business, Government, Start Up by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , ,

Andrew Ng helped create two of Silicon Valley’s leading artificial intelligence labs. First, he built Google Brain, now the hub of AI research inside the internet giant. Then he built a lab in the Valley for Baidu, the company known as the Google of China. Ng was one of the primary figures behind the enormous and rapid rise of AI over the last five years as everyone from Facebook to Microsoft rebuilt themselves around deep learning. And on Tuesday night, he announced his departure from Baidu. He didn’t say where he was going. And he didn’t immediately respond to our request for comment. But odds are, he will show up at some other big name sometime soon. AI researchers are …

View Post

Wall Street’s New Trick to Dodge Trump-Induced Stock Swings

In Business, Finance, Government, Healthcare by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , ,

By now you’ve seen how President Trump can move a market. He sends stocks soaring or sinking depending on what new nuggets his itchy Twitter fingers dash off on any given Saturday morning. That impulsiveness is already forcing bottom line-conscious businesses to kick their brand management into overdrive. Now a new online tool aims to help Wall Street hedge its bets in the face of a new and always unpredictable administration. It’s called—yes—Trump Tracker. Research firm Sentieo built Trump Tracker out of an existing product that enables hedge fund managers to scan public filings and receive instant, automated alerts for keywords. A manager with holdings in Ford, for instance, might want to set alerts for the term “autonomous vehicle” to …

View Post

Inside China’s Almost-Totally-Legal $400M Fishery in Africa

In Business, Education, Events, Government, Healthcare, Legal, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords:

Yuyang Liu stood aboard a Chinese trawler bobbing off the coast of Guinea-Bissau not long ago, trying with all his might to keep his breakfast down. The tossing of the sea made him woozy, and then there was the fish spilling out of the enormous net the crew hauled in. “It’s very wet. And smells not good. Really. It’s terrible,” he says. “Definitely the smelliest.” The ship, known as Fu Yuan Yu, is one of more than 400 Chinese fishing vessels trawling the coast of West Africa, pulling some three million tons of fish from the sea each year. Few things so clearly represent China’s influence in the region. “If you want to see how China is expanding power in West Africa, …

View Post

Astronomers Don’t Point This Telescope—The Telescope Points Them

In Government, Science & Nature, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

The hills of West Texas rise in waves around the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, a powerful instrument encased in a dome that looks like the Epcot ball. Soon, it will become more powerful still: Scientists recently primed the telescope to find evidence of dark energy in the early universe, prying open its eye so it can see and process a wide swath of sky. On April 8, scientists will dedicate the new telescope, capping off the $40 million upgrade and beginning the real work. The dark energy experiment, called Hetdex, isn’t how astronomy has traditionally been done. In the classical model, a lone astronomer goes to a mountaintop and solemnly points a telescope at one predetermined object. But Hetdex won’t look for …

View Post

The Guy Behind Ello (Remember Ello?) Just Built a Better Snapchat

In Business, Education, Government, Mobile Technology by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , ,

Let’s clear this up right from the start: Paul Budnitz does not want to take over the world. He didn’t create Ello to disrupt Facebook, even if the media says he did. And he definitely didn’t launch Wuu, an app that looks like Snapchat and Instagram yet stands firmly opposed to so much about them, in a bid to kill them. Really. He swears. No, Budnitz sees Wuu creating a space beyond those global town squares. A space where you don’t trade like for like or obsessively track your follower count. A space free of #influencers because everything is private. A space where people share silly photos, videos, and messages that vanish after 24 hours. A space—and this is key—without submenus and hamburger buttons. “I get frustrated with lots of …

View Post

Phone Companies Will Soon Banish Robocalls. For Real This Time

In Business, Government, Legal by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , ,

If Democrats, Republicans, and the telecommunications industry can agree on anything, it’s that robocalls are the worst. That’s why the Federal Communications Commission will likely pass rules today that expand the authority of phone companies to block unwanted phone calls. Short version: If a phone number seems at all likely to be bogus, companies can block it. The law forbids marketers from calling people who are on the Do Not Call list. Yet according to the FCC, consumers last year received about 2.4 billion robocalls per month. And these calls are more than just an annoyance: Last year the IRS estimated that scammers posing as tax collectors used robocalls to make off with about $26.5 million from the public. The …

View Post

The Billionaire on a Mission to Save the Planet From Trump

In Business, Education, Energy, Finance, Government, Healthcare, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , , , ,

Tom Steyer isn’t your average California tree hugger. The former hedge fund manager—number 1,121 on Forbes’ wealthiest people list, with $1.61 billion—was once best known for turning $15 million into $30 billion in about two decades. But then he went hiking. Steyer and environmental activist and author Bill McKibben spent a day trudging through the Adirondacks. Not long after, Steyer parted ways with the leadership of his company and his oil and gas investments, began to fight the Keystone XL pipeline, and then reinvented himself as a one-man superfund for climate causes. His organization, NextGen Climate, has spent $170 million over the past four years advocating for policies and politicians that help the environment and advance renewable energy. It’s an uphill battle. …

View Post

Don’t Buy the Latest Trump Surveillance Hype

In Business, Government, Legal, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , ,

On Wednesday, House Intelligence Committee Chair Devin Nunes made an unexpected revelation. The president and his associates, Nunes told a gaggle of reporters, were swept up in “incidental collection” by US intelligence agencies. It’s a charge that almost sounds like it validates Trump’s recent tweeted accusations that President Obama “wiretapped” Trump Tower. But it doesn’t. As with any story where so much of the underlying information remains classified, there aren’t many details to work with. A close look at what Nunes said today, though, fails to confirm any of Trump’s previous assertions. If anything, it raises more questions. Incidental Contact In case there’s any doubt, the Trump team has already championed the Nunes comments as validation. When asked if he …

View Post

The Senate Prepares to Send Internet Privacy Down a Black Hole

In Business, Government, Legal, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , ,

Today, while you’re not watching, the Senate could gut rules protecting your internet privacy. Last year the Federal Communications Commission passed a set of strict privacy regulations that ban broadband internet providers from selling your browsing data without your consent. Now, while most Americans are watching Neil Gorsuch’s Supreme Court nomination hearing and Obamacare repeal intrigue, senators could vote as early as today on a resolution to not only reverse the FCC’s action but block the agency from passing similar rules in the future. (The resolution would still need to pass the House and get President Trump’s signature to take effect.) Even if Republicans spike the Obama-era FCC’s protections, most of which have not taken effect yet, the agency will …

View Post

Congress Is About To Give Away Your Online Privacy

In Business, Events, Gaming, Government, Legal, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , ,

Congress is poised to roll back FCC privacy protections in a way that could seriously compromise our online lives. The protections require internet service providers to secure consumer data and obtain consumers’ consent before mining and selling it. WIRED OPINION About Terrell McSweeny (@TMcSweenyFTC) has been a commissioner at the Federal Trade Commission since 2014; previously she was a policy advisor to President Barack Obama and Vice President Joseph Biden. Chris Hoofnagle (@hoofnagle) is an adjunct professor of information and of law at UC Berkeley, and elected member of the American Law Institute. The resolution that could come to a Congressional vote this week aims to tackle differences in how the FCC rule treats ISPs compared with other internet companies. …

View Post

Trump’s FDA Pick Has Friends in Big Pharma. But Who Doesn’t?

In Business, Education, Emerging Technology, Finance, Government, Healthcare, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , ,

Shortly after taking office, President Trump told pharmaceutical CEOs visiting the White House that he would accelerate drug approvals by eliminating 75 to 80 percent of the regulations enforced by the US Food and Drug Administration. “Instead of it being 9,000 pages, it’ll be 100 pages,” he said. Slashing those rules could fall to Scott Gottlieb, the president’s pick for FDA commissioner. As with so many Trump nominees, expect Democrats to press the 44-year-old physician on his conflicts of interest when he appears before the Senate for confirmation. Gottlieb’s deep ties to the industry he would regulate go back more than decade, and he currently serves on the board of three pharmaceutical companies. His venture capital firm, new Enterprise Associates, funds 150 others. Gottlieb received more than $400,000 from Big …

View Post

What’s the Point of Going to Space if You Don’t Make Booze?

In Education, Government, Legal, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , ,

Last week, Anheuser-Busch announced a plan to sponsor research aboard the International Space Station to learn how to someday serve beer to astronauts on Mars. This is a dumb plan—not because beer is bad, or because astronauts responsible for settling the red planet won’t deserve a brewski at the end of a sol. It’s just, why beer? Distilled spirits—liquor—has always been a better fuel for exploration, or at least for explorers. Think English Navy grog: The higher alcohol content means it doesn’t spoil, and it’s compact. But because even the most generous launch manifest won’t stock enough booze for years-long settlement missions, astronauts are eventually going to have make everything from scratch. Liquor comes from ingredients that astronauts have already …

View Post

Samsung’s Bixby Hopes the World Needs Another Voice Assistant

In Business, Emerging Technology, Government, Mobile Technology by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , ,

Details about the upcoming Samsung Galaxy S8 are leaking so heavily they’re causing water damage. The latest spy shots suggest the curvy flagship phones do away with the home button on the front. But the new phones won’t be entirely touchscreen-operated. This week, Samsung announced there will be a dedicated button for summoning Bixby, the company’s brand-new voice assistant. Bixby represents a major reboot for S Voice, the voice assistant you probably forgot Samsung already has. Introduced in 2012 with the Galaxy S III, S Voice was largely a “me-too” voice platform that launched the year after Siri. It wasn’t terrible, it just didn’t distinguish itself. But Bixby will (eventually) feature advanced AI that could leapfrog Alexa, Google Assistant, and …

View Post

Good News: Android’s Huge Security Problem Is Getting Less Huge

In Business, Government, Legal, Mobile Technology, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , ,

First, the good news: Half of all Android devices have gotten fairly recent security updates, patching the hackable flaws that leave users vulnerable to digital crime and espionage. The bad news? The other half hasn’t. In an annual report on the security of the world’s 1.4 billion Android devices that Google released today, the company touts the ever-improving state of Android security. Less malware winds up in its Google Play store, devices are better encrypted, and more hackers than ever report Android bugs to Google in exchange for so-called “bug bounties.” But Google has also released solid data for the first time on Android’s most serious nagging security problem: The challenge of getting dozens of manufacturers and hundreds of carriers …

View Post

Forget Bitcoin. The Blockchain Could Reveal What’s True Today and Tomorrow

In Business, Education, Finance, Government, Science & Nature, Security, Start Up by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , , ,

As far back as the 1880s, people stood on the curb outside the New York Stock Exchange taking bets on political elections, and newspapers would report the odds as a way of predicting the results at the polls. In the years since, economists refined the concept, and more recently, prediction markets have tapped into the wisdom of the crowds via the internet, forecasting everything from presidential races to sporting events to stock prices. The concept took a hit in 2012 when a major site shutdown amid financial irregularities and pressure from US regulators. But Silicon Valley hasn’t given up on the idea. It now sees a new way of building markets that predict the future: the blockchain. The blockchain is …

View Post

LinkedIn Tries to Do Trending News in a Non-Disastrous Way

In Business, Finance, Government, Healthcare by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , ,

You’d think internet companies would want to stay far, far away from “trending” news, given one Menlo Park-based social giant’s unfortunate history. But LinkedIn has decided to try. The Microsoft-owned company doesn’t criticize Facebook directly. But its pitch for its new feature clearly telegraphs that it intends to avoid the pitfalls into which Facebook stumbled. LinkedIn’s Trending Storylines will start appearing in the US today and to international users soon after. A new “trending” tab will appear on mobile homescreens and on the top right-hand side of the LinkedIn homepage. As befits a social network that specializes in professional connections, the links will focus on business news—technology, health care, and finance to start. Facebook’s troubles really began after disgruntled contractors …

View Post

Intel’s Bold Plan to Reinvent Computer Memory (and Keep It a Secret)

In Business, Government by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , ,

Intel just unleashed a new kind of computer memory it believes will fundamentally change the way the world builds computers. But it won’t tell the world what’s inside. The company calls this new creation 3D XPoint—pronounced “three-dee cross-point”—and this week, after touting the stuff for a year-and-a-half, Intel finally pushed it into the market. You can think of the new technology as a computer building block that can serve more than one purpose—a single thing that can replace several others. But the new tech also serves as a way for Intel to shift multiple markets in its favor. That’s probably why it won’t say what the memory is actually made of. Certainly, Intel doesn’t want others duplicating the technology, which …

View Post

You Bought That Gadget, and Dammit, You Should Be Able to Fix It

In Business, Emerging Technology, Government, Legal, Mobile Technology, Science & Nature, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , ,

Michael Oberdick owns two small gadget repair shops in northwestern Ohio. He and his technicians spend their days at iOutlet replacing busted screens, repairing battered motherboards, and generally making life easier for people who’ve done something stupid with their gadgets. He found this job far easier just five years ago, when he started repairing phones for friends. Back then, anyone with basic tools, a little patience, and an instruction manual could fix just about anything. But these days, performing all but the most basic repairs requires specialized tools and knowledge that companies like Apple and Samsung guard jealously. That makes it hard for people like Oberdick to earn a living, and for people like you to repair your phone when you drop it. And that …

View Post

Android O, Google’s Next OS, Is Coming to Save Your Phone’s Battery

In Business, Gaming, Government, Healthcare, Mobile Technology by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , ,

Apple gets all the attention, but Android remains the world’s biggest operating system. You find it everywhere, which means it absolutely must work on devices of every size, shape, and spec. Now that you can use Android apps on ChromeOS, that opens them up to gadgets with trackpads, keyboards, pens, and who knows what else. Android works in your car, on your TV, and on your face. All of which makes being an Android dev complicated, and gives Google a lot to consider as it works on upgrades. Google just released a few tidbits about the next version of Android, which arrives later this year and is known for now as Android O. (Not that I’m speculating, but Android Oreo? Android …

View Post

Only an End to Global Warming Can Save the Great Barrier Reef

In Events, Finance, Government, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

This story originally appeared on the Guardian and is part of the Climate Desk collaboration. The survival of the Great Barrier Reef hinges on urgent moves to cut global warming because nothing else will protect coral from the coming cycle of mass bleaching events, new research has found. The study of three mass bleaching events on Australian reefs in 1998, 2002 and 2016 found coral was damaged by underwater heatwaves regardless of any local improvements to water quality or fishing controls. The research, authored by 46 scientists and published in Nature, raises serious questions about Australia’s long-term conservation plan for its famous reef, which invests heavily in lifting water quality but is silent on climate-change action. The researchers said the findings of their paper, …

View Post

Iron Fist Can Totally Break His Fall With a Pole. Physics Says So

In Government, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

I love Iron Fist, so of course I watched the new Netflix series Iron Fist. I’ll withhold comment on whether it’s any good because I’m a physicist, not a TV critic. But I will say the show provides some fun opportunities to look at physics with questions like how much energy he packs into his superpowered punch. One in particular involves …. oh. Wait. This isn’t a big spoiler, but I’ll warn you just in case. Spoiler ahead. There. You’ve been warned. So in one early episode, Iron Fist falls some distance before catching himself on a pole. It got me thinking about how far he could fall and still safely stop himself. Then I wondered what kind of acceleration he’d experience …

View Post

Stop Everything, There’s a Red iPhone 7 Now

In Business, Mobile Technology by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

Some mornings—not many, but some—you wake up to a new iPhone. Surprise! This is one of those mornings. And while today’s new iPhone acts just like the old one, it adds a certain special something. It’s red. Yes, red, a bright, brilliant, gleaming red, a shade so bright it makes rose gold blush. The case is read. The buttons are red. The fiddly little nano-SIM tray? It’s red, too. The Apple logo? Not red. Sorry! But it really pops against all the rest of the red. Inside, of course, the new iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus have all the same internals as their space grey (and so on) counterparts. But that’s okay! New gadgets don’t have to be functionally …

View Post

Facebook’s Epic Data Blast Is Good for Everyone—Especially Facebook

In Business, Education, Emerging Technology, Government by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , ,

Engineers recently tested a new way of sending information across a trans-Atlantic internet cable, showing it could push two-and-a-half-times more data through this pipe than current methods. They claim the tests set a record for this kind of intercontinental connection, a key component of the modern internet. But the record isn’t as interesting as who ran the test: Facebook. Using hardware designed by researchers at Bell Labs—the iconic R&D shop now owned by Nokia—Facebook ran these tests across optical fiber it owns inside an undersea cable called America Europe Connect, which stretches from New York to Ireland. “Experiments commissioned by Facebook are setting records. That’s something new,” says Jonathan Kahn, a Stanford University engineering professor who specializes in optical communications. …

View Post

The Sad, Unnatural Habitats of Polar Bears in Captivity

In Business, Government, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

Polar bears are magnificent apex predators that spend most of their lives roaming the sea ice of the Arctic, where they hunt for seals. Everything about them evolved to suit living in one of the harshest environments on Earth. All of which makes it more than a little sad to see them in a zoo, where they too often live in small enclosures, swim in lukewarm pools, and dine on anything but blubber. “Combined with artificial habitats and props, the bears look very awkward,” says Shen Wen Lo, who spent a year photographing polar bear exhibits throughout Europe and China for White Bear. “It’s a forced reality.” This is true of all zoo animals, but Wen Lo thought polar bears …

View Post

Catnip Ain’t the Only Plant That’ll Send Your Kitty to Blissville

In Business, Government, Healthcare, Legal, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords:

The feline approaches its prey. Slowly at first, then crescendoing to a pounce that lands near, but not on the unmoving target. The cat bats an investigatory paw, then claws its target and yanks it faceward. But the cat does not bare its fangs; it does not bite. It closes its eyes and rubs the prey—a sock flecked with bits of dried herb—across its whiskers, then falls to the ground, its body humming with purrs that oscillate into soft meows. Most cats love nip, and many cat owners love watching their companions nip out. But not all cats freak out when they sniff the fragrant herb—some just don’t react at all. Which is a shame, because catnip can be a …

View Post

A Cybersecurity Arsenal That’ll Help ‘Protect Your Election’

In Business, Education, Government, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , ,

The rise of cheap digital attacks like phishing and DDoS doesn’t just endanger businesses. It also endangers democratic elections around the world, in which a well-timed data breach or site outage can meaningfully impact—and potentially destabilize—the democratic process. That’s why Jigsaw and Google, both divisions of Alphabet, are launching a suite of cybersecurity tools today called “Protect Your Election.” They hope to provide a set of free cyber-defenses that can support the independent news outlets, election monitoring and audit groups, activists, and human rights organizations that help elections run smoothly. The innovation here isn’t the tools themselves, but packaging them in a way that makes them accessible to the people who need them most. “There’s a spike in the most …

View Post

Inside the Hunt for Russia’s Most Notorious Hacker

In Business, Gaming, Government, Legal, Mobile Technology, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , , , ,

Craig’s first major break in the case came in September 2009. With the help of some industry experts, he identified a New York–based server that seemed to play some sort of role in the Zeus network. He obtained a search warrant, and an FBI forensics team copied the server’s data onto a hard drive, then overnighted it to Nebraska. When an engineer in Omaha examined the results, he sat in awe for a moment. The hard drive contained tens of thousands of lines of instant message chat logs in Russian and Ukrainian. Looking over at Craig, the engineer said: “You have their Jabber server.” This was the gang’s whole digital operation—a road map to the entire case. The cybersecurity firm …

View Post

So the FCC Head Says the Media Isn’t the Enemy. In 2017, That’s News

In Business, Events, Government, Legal by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , ,

Earlier this month, senators asked Federal Communications Commission chair Ajit Pai whether he agreed with President Trump that the media is the enemy of the American people. Pai demurred, saying he didn’t want to wade into political debates. Thirteen days later, he finally answered the question. No, he doesn’t think the media is the enemy. “A free media is vital to our democracy,” he wrote in a letter to Senate Democrats who continued to press the issue. It’s a remarkable thing for any civil servant to have to say. But in the Trump era, it needed saying. Trump once said he has a “running war with the media.” He has promised to “open up” libel laws to expose journalists to …

View Post

Russia? Nah. The House GOP Goes After Leakers Instead

In Business, Government, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , ,

On Monday, FBI Director James Comey led off a House Select Intelligence Committee hearing with a bombshell: His agency has been investigating potential ties between the Trump campaign and Russia. And has been since last summer. It was odd, then, that in their subsequent questioning, Republican representatives barely asked about Russia or Trump at all, but instead about the spate of media leaks that had previously brought those connections to light. In fairness, Russia garnered some attention. Democrat Adam Schiff of California used his opening statement to detail the connective fibers between the Trump campaign and Moscow. But throughout the hours-long hearing, the questioning ping-ponged across party lines. Democrats wanted to know about Russia. The GOP, meanwhile, missed the forest …

View Post

Not Even the FBI Can Get Trump to Drop His Wiretap Claims

In Business, Government, Legal, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , ,

The White House refuses to give up on its unfounded claims that President Obama wiretapped Trump Tower during the 2016 election, even as the country’s leading law enforcement and intelligence officials flatly stated that they have no evidence of such spying. Today, FBI director James Comey and NSA director Mike Rogers told the House Intelligence Committee that they’ve seen nothing to confirm the allegation President Trump made in a tweet March 4. Yet the White House stands by a story various Trump surrogates have repeated in the weeks since. “There’s a lot more questions that need to be asked about what was being done in terms of surveillance,” White House press secretary Sean Spicer said at a press briefing today. “Who was …

View Post

Trump’s TSA Budget Fails to Cut the Obvious: Air Marshals

In Business, Education, Government, Legal, Science & Nature, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , ,

To fund President Donald Trump’s fanciful plans for a massive southern border wall, his administration is scrounging around in the budgets of current US government programs. The results are evident in last week’s budget blueprint. WIRED OPINION About John Mueller is a political scientist at the Cato Institute and at Ohio State University. Mark Stewart is a civil engineer and risk analyst at the University of Newcastle in Australia. They are the authors of Terror, Security, and Money (2011), Chasing Ghosts (2016), and the forthcoming Are We Safe Enough? Measuring and Assessing Aviation Security. The administration has been looking to squeeze money from the budget of the Transportation Security Administration, which may represent an admission that some of the money …

View Post

The FBI Began Investigating Trump’s Potential Russia Ties Last Summer

In Business, Government, Legal, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , , ,

Since the day he was elected, President Trump’s administration has been dogged by suspicions that his campaign staff colluded with the Russian government to tip the election in his favor—particularly through the intrusion into the Democratic National Committee and the Clinton campaign by Kremlin hackers. Now, nine months since the earliest of those intrusions came to light, the FBI has confirmed that since July, it’s been investigating possible connections between Trump’s campaign and the Russian government. In a hearing of the House of Representatives’ Select Intelligence Committee Monday into possible Russian interference in the election, FBI Director Comey stated for the first time that the agency he leads is investigating Russia-Trump ties. “I’ve been authorized by the Department of Justice …

View Post

Meet Lorek, the Robot That Communicates in a Remarkable Way

In Education, Emerging Technology by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

You can’t have a conversation with your microwave or refrigerator—unless, of course, you’re on acid. And that’s all right, because these machines serve their purpose just fine as-is. They can afford to be shy. But the robots that will one day move into your home can’t. To be truly useful, they’ll need to speak human language and understand human gestures. Which makes a repurposed Baxter industrial robot renamed Lorek all the more remarkable: It not only recognizes an object a human being is pointing at and talking about, but asks questions to clarify what they mean. Lorek is limited to trafficking in specific objects, sure, but the robot is a big deal for the budding field of human-robot interaction. The …

View Post

Got a Sock Stuck in Your Vacuum? It’s Time for Some Physics

In Business by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Page Views:

Imagine yourself running the vacuum cleaner over the carpet when all of sudden—a sock. Boom. It’s stuck in the hose, the whine of the vacuum getting higher and higher, louder and louder. It sounds like overload is imminent, like the motor is working way too hard. But is it? To know, let’s look at some cool physics principles. Electric Motor Vacuum cleaners don’t actually suck. They blow. No, really. They use a fan that blows air out of a hole. That air must come from somewhere, so as air gets blown out of the vacuum, it gets drawn into the vacuum, bringing dirt and, occasionally, a sock with it. At the heart of that process lies an electric motor. In its most basic form, …

View Post

Ex-Googlers Build a Neural Network to Protect Your Heart

In Business, Government, Healthcare by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

The world knows no deadlier assassin than heart disease. It accounts for one in four fatalities in the US. Early detection remains the key to saving lives, but catching problems at the right time too often relies upon dumb luck. The most effective way of identifying problems involves an EKG machine, a bulky device with electrodes and wires. Even many portable machines like battery-powered Holter monitors, are unwieldy. And so most people visit a doctor for an electrocardiogram. That, too, is no guarantee, because the best detection means being tested when a potential problem reveals itself. Otherwise, early signs of heart disease might go undetected. At-risk patients eager to keep an eye on their ticker might find a compact, easy to use, and EKG machine a …

View Post

Wanna Be a Cop in Milan? Well, So Do 10,000 Other People

In Business, Government by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , ,

Finding a job sometimes feels impossible. Enduring an endless cycle of Google searches, resumes, and cover letters can leave you thinking everyone is after the same jobs you are. That’s actually true in Italy, where thousands of people apply for any government position that comes up, and endure the rigorous tests needed to land one. Michele Borzoni captures the impossible odds in Open Competitive Examinations, his photo series documenting the entrance exams that draw hundreds of people to gymnasiums, concert halls, and sporting arenas around the country. Each of them wants to be a police officer, teacher, or nurse. They face long odds. “It’s more like a lottery rather than an exam,” Borzoni says. “Ten thousand people looking for 14 places? To get a job, …

View Post
Number of Items Identified: 12
Item #Item NameScoreItem Classification
1python0.816animal, reptile, constrictor snake, python
2constrictor snake0.827
3snake0.889
4reptile0.89
5animal0.908
6sea snake0.607animal, reptile, sea snake
7steel blue color0.653
8purplish blue color0.626

Bacteria Are Brewing Up the Next Generation of Antivenoms

In Education, Events, Finance, Healthcare, Science & Nature, Start Up by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , ,

Daniel Dempsey was a grad student stationed in the jungles of Monteverde, Costa Rica when he first encountered the danger of a snakebite. The biologist was walking through the forest one day, catching bats to study them for malaria, when he almost stepped on the black, arrow-shaped head of an enormous pit viper—a fer-de-lance. That night as he described his encounter to the local family he was staying with, they began to tear up. They told him that earlier that year a “terciopelo,” what Costa Ricans call their country’s deadliest snake, had bitten the family’s five year-old niece. The hospital, a few hours drive away, didn’t have any antivenom in their stocks. She didn’t make it. It was Dempsey’s memory of …

View Post

A ‘Digital Alchemist’ Unravels the Mysteries of Complexity

In Education, Government, Legal, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

Sharon Glotzer has made a number of career-shifting discoveries, each one the kind “that completely changes the way you look at the world,” she said, “and causes you to say, ‘Wow, I need to follow this.’” A theoretical soft condensed matter physicist by training who now heads a thriving 33-person research group spanning three departments at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Glotzer uses computer simulations to study emergence—the phenomenon whereby simple objects give rise to surprising collective behaviors. “When flocks of starlings make these incredible patterns in the sky that look like they’re not even real, the way they’re changing constantly—people have been seeing those patterns since people were on the planet,” she said. “But only recently have …

View Post

Phishing Scams Even Fool Tech Nerds—Here’s How to Avoid Them

In Business, Government, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , ,

You know not to click on links in sketchy emails. Everybody knows that. And yet, people fall for these phishing attacks all the time. Case in point: The FBI suspects a phishing email is how the Russian hackers who were indicted this week got into Yahoo. Ditto for the breach of the Democratic National Committee, and the Sony Pictures hack. In fact, there’s currently a Gmail phishing scam going around that even super savvy techies are falling for. Phishing scams work by tricking you into clicking on a link or attachment that either infects your machine with malware or takes you to a page that looks totally legit, but isn’t and is designed to steal your private information. According to …

View Post

Hey Activists: You Need to Think Twice Before Livestreaming Protests

In Business, Events, Government, Legal, Science & Nature, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , , , ,

After a few hours of watching livestreamers E-Poemz or Johnny Dangers on February 22, 2017, you might have felt like you knew them. Their voices, narrating livestreams of the slow-motion eviction of Dakota Access pipeline protesters from a Standing Rock protest site (on land claimed by the Army Corp of Engineers), became familiar. For those viewers not accustomed to police at protests, it might been a shock when officers tackled and arrested E-Poemz, possibly seriously injuring him. His livestream ends with a sideways shot from his camera lying on the ground. WIRED OPINION About Dia Kayyali (@diakayyali) is a human rights and digital security activist. They currently serve as senior program coordinator for technology and advocacy at Witness, a human …

View Post

Don’t Blame the Batteries For Every Lithium-Ion Explosion

In Business, Government, Legal, Mobile Technology, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , ,

Lithium-ion batteries have been making headlines for all the wrong reasons. The latest marquee moment involved a pair of exploding headphones on a plane. That incendiary incident came hot on the heels of Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7 (double) recall and major issues with “hoverboard” batteries. You can’t chalk it all up to incompetence, either. Even rocket scientists have trouble keeping lithium-ion batteries in check. By nature, lithium-ion batteries are dangerous. Inside, the main line of defense against short circuiting is a thin and porous slip of polypropylene that keeps the electrodes from touching. If that separator is breached, the electrodes come in contact, and things get very hot very quickly. The batteries are also filled with a flammable electrolyte, one …

View Post

Peer Into the Post-Apocalyptic Future of Antimicrobial Resistance

In Business, Education, Events, Government, Healthcare, Legal, Science & Nature, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , ,

About 4 million years ago, a cave was forming in the Delaware Basin of what is now Carlsbad Caverns National Park in New Mexico. From that time on, Lechuguilla Cave remained untouched by humans or animals until its discovery in 1986—an isolated, pristine primeval ecosystem. When the bacteria found on the walls of Lechuguilla were analyzed, many of the microbes were determined not only to have resistance to natural antibiotics like penicillin, but also to synthetic antibiotics that did not exist on earth until the second half of the twentieth century. As infectious disease specialist Brad Spellberg put it in the New England Journal of Medicine, “These results underscore a critical reality: antibiotic resistance already exists, widely disseminated in nature, …

View Post
Number of Items Identified: 4
Item #Item NameScoreItem Classification
1Trapezium0.956
2crimson color0.724
3sanguine (red) color0.665

Space Photos of the Week: Three Young Stars Decide to Peace Out

In Government, Legal, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , ,

Astronomy compels us to look upward, and leads us from this world to another. Plato said that more than 2,300 years ago, and it remains just as true today. The wonders of space never cease to amaze, and if you doubt that, check out the latest photos from NASA. How can you not feel awed by a photo of the Trapezium Cluster, where three young stars move away from each other? Or fascination pondering an unfathomably vast gas cloud in a distant galaxy? They’re as mystifying as they are beautiful. It’s not for nothing that Emerson said, “the sky is the ultimate art gallery, just above us.” If you can look at a photo of the Saturnian moon Mimas (the …

View Post
Number of Items Identified: 11
Item #Item NameScoreItem Classification
1wasp0.739animal, invertebrate, insect, wasp
2insect0.867
3invertebrate0.903
4animal0.903
5ant0.634animal, invertebrate, insect, ant
6spider0.621
7green color0.999

How to Film at 40 Below Without Killing Your Camera—or Yourself

In Government by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

When the trailer dropped for the BBC’s new Planet Earth II series, the most memeable moment was a small fox diving confidently and head-first into a pile of snow. It’s a perfect snippet for a good ol’ “It me,” or a “When it’s Monday,” or really just about anything else. But did you ever wonder about the person filming that moment? Standing there in 40-below weather, periodically punching themselves in the eye to keep it from freezing every time she blinks? That’s what Chadden Hunter and his team had to do, during the shoot for this weekend’s Grasslands episode. Over the last few weeks, we’ve been talking with the creators of Planet Earth II about how exactly they make a …

View Post

Security News This Week: A Funny Thing Happens When the US Accuses the UK of Spying

In Business, Events, Gaming, Government, Legal, Mobile Technology, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , , , ,

Nothing much of interest happened in the world of cybersecurity this week. Kidding! But wouldn’t that be nice? If we were living in a simpler time when innocent victims weren’t hit by a new, weird hack every day, and international cyberespionage wasn’t undermining everything from governments to businesses to Twitter accounts? You could just argue about who won The Bachelor and move on with your life. Unfortunately, this is 2017, so naturally this week’s hacks were actually completely ridiculous. First of all, the United States indicted two official Russian spies for hacking Yahoo back in 2014. Presidential advisor Kellyanne Conway confused a lot of people when she said their microwaves are spying on them (don’t worry: they aren’t…yet). A new …

View Post

Germany’s Flawed Plan to Fight Hate Speech by Fining Tech Giants Millions

In Business, Education, Government, Legal by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , ,

The way tech companies deal with online harassment and abuse is broken. YouTube allows anti-Semitism to stay live. Twitter waffles as targeted harassment runs rampant. Facebook takes down an iconic photo that shouldn’t be banned. Now one German politician is tired of letting platforms make excuses. Heiko Mass, Germany’s minister of justice and consumer protection, said this week that he will propose a law that would fine social media companies up to €50 million ($53 million) for not responding quickly enough to reports of illegal content or hate speech. The law would require social media platforms to come up with ways to make it easy for users to report hateful content. Companies would have 24 hours to respond to “obviously …

View Post

The Stream Dream

In Business, Events, Government, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , ,

It was a big week for the security community. On Tuesday, WikiLeaks published some 9,000 pages of documents detailing various hacking tools the CIA had developed to spy on intelligence targets. They hit the public like a punch to the gut. Your cellphone can be hacked. Your Windows PC or Mac is pudding in the hands of government snoops. Even a smart TV can be converted into a bug that records private conversations. Jiminy! That’s pretty nuts. WIRED’s security editor Brian Barrett joins Michael Calore to talk about the Vault 7 revelations, and what they mean for consumers. Some links: Andy Greenberg details the tools exposed in the Vault 7 leak. Mike tells you how to find out if your …

View Post

Review: Cuisinart Vertical Waffle Maker

In Government by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Page Views:

Waffles put pancakes to shame. Anyone with a frying pan can make a pancake. But a perfectly cooked waffle—crisp on the outside, soft and steaming on the inside, covered in those ingenious dimples that capture syrup and butter in tiny pockets? A thing of beauty. So why, you ask, are pancakes so much more common than their geometrically precise, architecturally sound cousins? Easy: the waffle iron. Those dreadful devices are clumsy, they demand entirely too much shelf space, and cleaning them is a nightmare. Cuisinart, however, has come up with a neat idea: Turn the whole thing on its side. Vertical Waffle Maker presents a compact, more practical spin on this essential tool, and it pumps out consistently crispy and …

View Post

The Caribbean Is Mobilizing 300,000 People for an Epic Tsunami Drill

In Business, Education, Gaming, Government, Healthcare, Science & Nature, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , ,

If you happen to be sunbathing on a quiet Caribbean beach next week, don’t be alarmed if a helicopter flies overhead warning everyone to evacuate to higher ground. It’s just a drill. A tsunami drill, actually, called Caribe Wave 2017, that will mobilize more than 300,000 people in 48 countries and territories in the Caribbean basin. The simulation will test the communication systems that connect those communities to the seismologists in Hawaii whose sensors and algorithms predict tsunamis. And perhaps more importantly, it will test the ability of local officials to get large numbers of people to drop what they are doing and move to safety. Advertisements on local media make sure that teachers, bosses, and hotel waiters in each …

View Post

Siri’s Not Even the Best iPhone Assistant Anymore

In Business, Government, Mobile Technology by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , ,

Apple’s Siri may not be the most capable voice assistant, or the most beloved. In the race to dominate the next generation of interfaces, though, Siri had one key advantage: a cushy home on hundreds of millions of iPhones. Now, however, Amazon has snuck Alexa onto iOS—making this look more and more like a blowout. What makes Alexa on iOS so intriguing isn’t just that it’s there, but where. There was already an Alexa app, a rudimentary utility app that let users fiddle with the settings on their Amazon Echoes. And there have been a handful of third-party paid apps that brought some Alexa voice functionality to the iPhone. Now, though, Alexa will live inside the main iOS Amazon app, …

View Post

Ex-FCC Boss: Gut Net Neutrality and You Gut Internet Freedom

In Business, Government, Legal, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , ,

In 2015, former Federal Communications Commission chair Tom Wheeler helped pass the Open Internet Order, a sweeping set of rules designed to protect net neutrality. The order effectively bans internet service providers from blocking or slowing down any legal content you might want to access online. Now net neutrality is in danger, and Wheeler isn’t pleased. At a Senate hearing last week, several Republican lawmakers asked the new FCC chair Ajit Pai to repeal the order, which he voted against. He assured them the FCC will revisit it soon. Republicans’ go-to argument against the order is that it gave the FCC the authority to regulate the internet. Wheeler, who stepped down as FCC chair on Inauguration Day this year, calls …

View Post

Surreal Drone Photos Transform America Into a Roller Coaster

In Business, Emerging Technology, Government by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords:

Pity the poor rancher who finds himself trapped in an Aydın Büyüktaş photo. There he is in his pickup, cruising along a flat Texas road with nothing but cows and cacti for miles around. The perspective shifts, he feels a tickle in his stomach, and suddenly he’s plunging down the first big drop on a rollercoaster. Büyüktaş uses a drone, 3-D rendering, and Photoshop to create a warped view of the world in Flatlands II. He pulled the same trick two years ago, turning his hometown of Istanbul into a mind-bending world that brought to mind the work of M.C. Escher. This time, he focused on the American Southwest. “The area is like heaven for a photographer,” he says. Büyüktaş always found …

View Post

Facebook’s Big ‘First Step’ to Crack Down on Surveillance

In Business, Government, Legal by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , ,

As social networks continue to mature, they increasingly take on roles they may not have anticipated. Moderating graphic imagery and hate speech, working to address trolling and harassment, and dealing with dissemination of fake news puts companies like Facebook and Twitter in powerful societal positions. Now, Facebook has acknowledged yet another challenge: Keeping your data safe from surveillance. That’s harder than it may sound. When you post something publicly on a social network, anyone can view it—including law enforcement or federal agencies. Those types of groups, particularly local police, have increasingly capitalized on social media as an investigatory resource. And those one-off cases hardly register compared to the mass surveillance tools that software companies can create by using a social …

View Post

Artificial Intelligence Is Learning to Predict and Prevent Suicide

In Business, Education, Government, Healthcare, Legal by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , ,

For years, Facebook has been investing in artificial intelligence fields like machine learning and deep neural nets to build its core business—selling you things better than anyone else in the world. But earlier this month, the company began turning some of those AI tools to a more noble goal: stopping people from taking their own lives. Admittedly, this isn’t entirely altruistic. Having people broadcast their suicides from Facebook Live isn’t good for the brand. But it’s not just tech giants like Facebook, Instagram, and China’s up-and-coming video platform Live.me who are devoting R&D to flagging self-harm. Doctors at research hospitals and even the US Department of Veterans Affairs are piloting new, AI-driven suicide-prevention platforms that capture more data than ever …

View Post
Number of Items Identified: 15
Item #Item NameScoreItem Classification
1ball0.754
2candy egg0.626food, nutrition, delicacy, sweet, candy egg
3candy0.781
4sweet0.781
5delicacy0.782
6nutrition0.782
7food0.782
8greenish blue color0.769
9indigo color0.654

Trump’s Trying to Chainsaw Nearly Every Environmental Program

In Business, Emerging Technology, Finance, Government, Healthcare, Legal, Science & Nature, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , , , ,

As expected, President Trump’s proposed federal budget delivers a wind-sucking gut-punch to the Environmental Protection Agency. If the president has his way, the regulatory agency will lose nearly one-third of its 2016 budget of $8.1 billion, mostly through deep cuts to climate, clean air, and environmental restoration programs like Superfund. Of course, the odds of Congress actually adopting Trump’s entire plan are slim—though Republicans probably won’t have too many conflicts with his environmental axe-slinging. Still, the document provides key insights into the president’s priorities, attitudes, and thinking. And he clearly takes aim at a slew of federal agencies and programs that seek to protect the planet. Across nearly every appendage of the executive body, his budget treats such projects like malignant growths. But …

View Post
Number of Items Identified: 2
Item #Item NameScoreItem Classification
1yellow color0.697

Trump’s Budget Would Break American Science, Today and Tomorrow

In Business, Education, Government, Healthcare, Legal, Science & Nature, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , ,

You can go ahead and assume President Trump’s proposed federal budget will never be the actual federal budget. Members of Congress from every political persuasion will find a lot to hate about it, and they’re the ones who have to approve it—assuming they can sort out the arcane, procrustean rules for getting any budget passed in Washington. It’s still worth looking at the budget, though—not as a blueprint for governing but as a map of a government, a philosophy of a state. From that angle it’s a singularly terrifying document, fundamentally nihilistic, that assumes a violent present instead of attempting to build a future of peace, security, and absence of want. By eviscerating federal funding of science, this budget pays …

View Post

Trump Can’t Quit His Wiretap Claims. That Won’t End Well

In Business, Government, Legal by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , ,

Barack Obama did not wiretap Trump Tower ahead of the presidential election. The definitive word on this came today from two people who would know: Richard Burr and Mark Warner, who lead the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. Of course, President Donald Trump refuses to believe this, even though it is the best news he could hope for. If you’ve somehow avoided this crazy story, and bless you if so, 12 days ago, Trump made a series of increasingly angry tweets accusing Obama of wiretapping Trump Tower. He called the former president a “bad (or sick) guy” and provided absolutely no evidence supporting his claim. Obama, through a spokesman, categorically denied the charge. In the days since, Democratic and Republican lawmakers alike denounced the claim, and …

View Post

Trump’s Budget Is Awful if You’re a Worker, Great if You’re a Robot

In Business, Education, Emerging Technology, Finance, Government, Healthcare, Science & Nature, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , , , ,

When the robots rise up, they won’t take your life. They’ll take your job, particularly those in fields primed for automation, like manufacturing, trucking, and customer service. Technologists, economists, and policymakers believe this future is all but inevitable, and say it’s time to begin thinking seriously about how to ensure artificial intelligence advances humanity—and improves the economy, without leaving the middle class behind. Two economists who recently left Washington say the answer lies in ensuring the government provides enough of a safety net to help middle class Americans navigate the coming transition. Jason Furman and Gene Sperling—former chief economic advisors to President Obama—prefer to think of it as a bridge, not a net, that will help people reach the future. At a conference at MIT last …

View Post

Obamacare Paved the Way for That Gattaca-Style Employer’s Law

In Education, Emerging Technology, Government, Healthcare, Legal, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , ,

Republicans have promised to repeal the Affordable Care Act since the day President Obama signed it into law in March, 2010. Now, seven years later, they’re trying to push through a bill that divides their own party and prescribes the evaporation of coverage for millions of people, just to keep their promise. Still, there’s one part of Obama’s health care bill that they liked: a set of employee wellness program provisions they can use to loosen privacy protections on personal health data, including the most personal: your genes. Last Wednesday, while Washington was in an uproar over the newly introduced ACA replacement, the House Committee on Education and the Workforce quietly passed a much smaller, supplementary health care bill called …

View Post

The Secret of the Crazy-Tough Water Bear, Finally Revealed

In Education, Government by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Page Views:

The world knows no toughness like that of the water bear, which looks like a cannon wearing a pair of wrinkled khakis. This microscopic critter can survive boiling water (and alcohol too, just to be safe), some of the lowest temperatures in the universe, and blasts of radiation that would kill a human. In the slightly edited but still immortal words of Austin Powers: “Why won’t the water bear die?” The question has for decades baffled scientists, who suspected the water bear—also known as a tardigrade—mobilizes a sugar called trehalose to reinforce its body and keep its cells from swift destruction. But no longer. In a paper out today in Molecular Cell, researchers claim they’ve found an exclusively tardigradean protein …

View Post

At SXSW, Tech Reckons With the Problems It Helped Create

In Business, Government, Healthcare, Legal, Mobile Technology, Security, Start Up by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , , , ,

Hangovers are a fixture of South by Southwest. Free branded booze abounds, turning late nights into too-early mornings filled with product demos and repetitive panels. But determined marketers and wide-eyed founders pitch on through the pain, in the unbridled belief they might just be SXSW’s next breakout star. Or at the very least, its next Meerkat. But this year, the conference itself feels a lot like a hangover. It’s as if the coastal elites who attend each year finally woke up with a serious case of the Sunday scaries, realizing that the many apps, platforms, and doodads SXSW has launched and glorified over the years haven’t really made the world a better place. In fact, they’ve often come with wildly …

View Post

Holy Shucking Fit: You’re Opening Oysters Wrong

In Government by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Page Views:

Not quite a year ago, I wrote a story about the merits of good oyster knives, getting a shucking lesson from a pro in the process. I walked away from the lesson with a refreshed appreciation for finding the right tool for the job, but what was most impressive was the shucker’s technique, which was like nothing I’d ever seen. My lesson came from Lucas Stone, a shucker at Seattle’s fantastic Westward restaurant, and he demonstrated a subtle technique with the formal beauty that recalled the tango. Choking up on the knife with one hand and palming the oyster in the other, he snugged the tip of the blade into the oyster hinge, then raised them together to his chest, …

View Post

The Workers Who Snap Selfies Dangling From Skyscrapers

In Government, Legal by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Page Views:

Admit it. Your job is boring. Even if love your job, no one wants to see pictures of you doing it. Unless you spend your days dangling from a rope washing windows, cleaning wind turbines, or doing any number of vertigo-inducing tasks that require hanging hundreds of feet in the air. Everyone wants to see pictures of that. Open Instagram and check out hashtags like #ropeaccess and #ropeaccesstechnician and #womeninropeaccess. You’ll find thousands upon thousands of photos. It makes sense when you think about it—the job is inherently photogenic, given the risk and spectacular views (and, occasionally, cats). “You can get awesome pictures,” says Cerriann Morgan, a rope access worker in Ireland. “They look absolutely wicked.” Rope access applies mountaineering and caving …

View Post

It Begins: Bots Are Learning to Chat in Their Own Language

In Business, Education, Emerging Technology, Government, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , ,

Igor Mordatch is working to build machines that can carry on a conversation. That’s something so many people are working on. In Silicon Valley, chatbot is now a bona fide buzzword. But Mordatch is different. He’s not a linguist. He doesn’t deal in the AI techniques that typically reach for language. He’s a roboticist who began his career as an animator. He spent time at Pixar and worked on Toy Story 3, in between stints as an academic at places like Stanford and the University of Washington, where he taught robots to move like humans. “Creating movement from scratch is what I was always interested in,” he says. Now, all this expertise is coming together in an unexpected way. Born …

View Post

The Initial Coin Offering, the Bitcoin-y Stock That’s Not Stock—But Definitely a Big Deal

In Business, Finance, Government, Legal, Security, Start Up by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , ,

Next month, a venture capital firm called Blockchain Capital plans to do something that could change the way companies get funded—and perhaps even the way they operate. Instead of an Initial Public Offering, in which a company sells stock via a regulated exchange like Nasdaq, the San Francisco-based VC firm is making an Initial Coin Offering, selling its own digital token as a way of raising money for its latest venture fund. Anyone who buys a token will be buying into the fund. Yes, they call it an ICO, and over the last 14 months, more than 60 startups, open source projects, and ragtag online communities used this method to raise over $250 million for their own business efforts. “The …

View Post
Number of Items Identified: 10
Item #Item NameScoreItem Classification
1lollipop0.651food, nutrition, delicacy, sweet, candy, lollipop
2candy0.653
3sweet0.653
4delicacy0.653
5nutrition0.653
6food0.654
7tray0.623receptacle, tray
8receptacle0.623
9yellow color0.987

Clean Energy Could Spark a Trade War Between the US and China

In Business, Emerging Technology, Government, Security, Start Up by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , ,

If you believe the geopolitical soothsayers, the US and China are headed for an economic confrontation. President Donald Trump has marked his first 100 days in office with efforts to roll back many of his predecessor’s climate-conscious programs, making business easier for fossil fuel companies, car manufacturers, and chemical companies. China is taking the opposite tack. In the past few years, China has surpassed the US in electric vehicle sales, renewable energy capacity, and recently announced it was investing $365 billion to keep the momentum going. That investment puts China in a prime position to lead the world in clean energy, selling its innovations to other countries looking to cut their energy bills. So if a trade war breaks out …

View Post

Blocked Immigration Ban Proves Trump’s Tweets Will Haunt His Presidency

In Business, Education, Government, Legal, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , ,

In his decision blocking the Trump administration’s revised travel ban, Judge Derrick Watson of Hawaii writes that he didn’t have to psychoanalyze President Trump or his staff to clearly see the executive order’s intention was to ban Muslims. All the proof he needed was right there on television—and on Twitter. “There is nothing ‘veiled’ about this press release: ‘Donald J. Trump is calling for a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States,’” Judge Watson’s opinion reads, quoting from the Trump campaign’s own website. The opinion, which issues a nationwide temporary restraining order on the new ban, is littered with Trump’s own words, the words of his staffers (including author of the first ban Stephen Miller), and even …

View Post

WIRED Had a Potential Infosecurity Problem. Here’s What We Did About It

In Business, Events, Government, Science & Nature, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , ,

On February 26th, WIRED’s security reporter Andy Greenberg received an email from Sophia Tupolev, the head of communications at the security firm Beame.io, saying she’d found a security issue on WIRED.com. Tupolev’s company had discovered sensitive data in the source code on many pages on our site, including obfuscated, “hashed” passwords and email addresses for current and former WIRED writers. We corrected the problem right away. About two hours after we found out about the issue, we had a fix in place, and had cleared the data from the affected pages. Shortly thereafter, we invalidated everyone’s passwords, even though we believed the hashed passwords were relatively safe. Moreover, everyone accesses WIRED’s content management system with two-factor authentication. That makes it …

View Post

How Lithium-Ion Batteries Turn Into Skin-Searing Firebombs

In Energy, Government, Mobile Technology, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , ,

Who runs the world? Lithium-ion batteries! (Sorry, Beyoncé.) Ever since Sony commercialized the chemistry in 1991, Li-ion cells have powered everything from the Mars Curiosity rover to the device you’re using to read these words. The tech has endured for good reason: It charges quickly, fits a ton of energy into a slim package (lithium is the lightest metal and is highly reactive), and is generally pretty safe. But when things go wrong, they go very wrong. Scores of Galaxy Note 7s and hoverboards have succumbed to the fiery embrace of a malfunctioning Li-ion battery. Here is what’s inside the little fuel packs that power your life—and how they can turn into battery flambé. Lithium Cobalt Oxide To store or …

View Post

Russian Spies Helped Hack Yahoo, As If Tensions Weren’t High Enough

In Business, Education, Government, Legal, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , , , ,

On Wednesday, the Department of Justice indicted two Russian hackers, as well as two Russian spies, in the 2014 Yahoo data breach that compromised 500 million user accounts. (Not to be confused with the breach of 1 billion Yahoo accounts in 2013.) The charges are hacking, economic espionage, trade secret theft, wire fraud, and identity theft. It’s also the first time the US has brought criminal cyber-charges against active Russian officials. The two spies, Igor Sushchin and Dmitry Dokuchaev, are members of the Russian intelligence agency FSB, and work for its cyber investigation division. They allegedly worked with two non-government hackers, Alexsey Belan and Karim Baratov, who has Canadian citizenship and was arrested there on Tuesday. Belan, who has been …

View Post

WhatsApp Hack Shows That Even Encryption Apps Are Vulnerable in a Browser

In Business, Education, Government, Legal, Mobile Technology, Science & Nature, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , ,

When WhatsApp switched on end-to-end encryption for its billion-plus users last year, the move heralded a new era for messaging apps, one where foiling virtually all eavesdropping represents the new security standard. But a pair of new attacks on the web versions of those “secure” messengers shows how just a few lines of insecure code can undermine even the most airtight encryption—particularly when they’re running in your browser. On Wednesday, Israeli security firm Check Point revealed a new technique that the company says could bypass WhatsApp’s end-to-end encryption, by hiding HTML code in a seemingly innocuous image. If a user clicks on it while using the web version of the app, the code runs in the victim’s browser, gaining full …

View Post

Samsung’s Classy New Gadget Is Half TV, Half Work of Art

In Business, Emerging Technology by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

Remember digital photo frames? Relics from the pre-iPad era, they were designed to sit on your coffee table and cycle through shots of your recent trip to Cincinnati. Once Apple came up with the clever idea of adding a battery, a touchscreen, and iOS to the same general form factor, digital photo frames may well have joined the witness protection program. Well, the novel little flatscreens just reentered the mainstream, and they’re sassier than ever. Alongside a bunch of new high-end 4K HDR TVs, Samsung announced that a picture-frame/television hybrid dubbed The Frame will make its way into stores this Spring. There’s no pricing information on The Frame just yet, but it was birthed from the mind of famed product …

View Post
Number of Items Identified: 7
Item #Item NameScoreItem Classification
1surgical instrument0.937device, surgical instrument
2device0.937
3steel blue color0.95
4greenish blue color0.677

A Robot Ear Surgeon Drills Into the Future of Medicine

In Emerging Technology, Government, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

Technically it ain’t brain surgery, but let’s just say you wouldn’t want to do a cochlear implant while sleepy or distracted. So it’s a good thing this surgery robot can’t be either of those things. It drills into the bone behind the ear, watching with two shining eyes. The bit passes just half a millimeter from the facial nerve, and another half a millimeter from the taste nerve, before entering the spiraling cochlea of the inner ear. Here a human deposits an electrode. The first robot-assisted cochlear implant in a clinical trial, which researchers describe today in the journal Science Robotics, doesn’t just enhance a surgeon’s dexterity like the by-now-common da Vinci robot might. “We are interested in doing something …

View Post

Hack Brief: High-Profile Twitter Accounts Overrun With Swastikas

In Business, Education, Government, Legal, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

Last night, a swath of Twitter accounts with large followings—including Duke University, BBC North America, Forbes, and Amnesty International—tweeted out the same message, in Turkish, that included a swastika and hashtags that translate to “Nazi Germany, Nazi Holland.” The hacked accounts, which apparently stem from increasing vitriol between Turkey and Holland, appear to have all been restored. They’re an unfortunate reminder, though, any Twitter account is only as safe as the apps you let access it. The Hack Starting in the early hours of Wednesday morning, a diverse range of high-profile accounts—schools, news organizations, celebrities, and so on—all began tweeting the same message. It leads with a swastika, follows with the Nazi hashtags, calls the attack a “little Ottoman slap,” …

View Post
Number of Items Identified: 8
Item #Item NameScoreItem Classification
1shuttle0.829device, shuttle
2device0.829
3blue color0.725
4black color0.617

Watch as SpaceX Fires Off One of Its Last Expendable Rockets

In Emerging Technology, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

Landing rockets is SpaceX’s schtick. You know, we know, we’ve all covered it to death. But for the private space company’s latest mission, there will be no smooth reentry—not on land, not on a robot boat, nowhere. For once, SpaceX is just pulling off a regular old rocket launch. For one of the last times ever. If today’s weather holds up—and the Air Force’s weather team says there’s a 90 percent chance it will—SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket will carry the EchoStar XXIII satellite aloft at 1:35 AM EST. If you are awake and reading this at that godforsaken hour, you can watch it live here: [embedded content] The Falcon 9 won’t be guiding itself back to Earth because its payload is too …

View Post

Review: Tivoli Audio Model One Digital

In Education, Government, Legal, Start Up by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Page Views:

Sometimes an audio component punches so far above its weight that even the snootiest critics must acknowledge it. That happened back in 2000, when a small Boston startup called Tivoli Audio launched the Model One. Stereophile voted it a runner-up in its sacred “Analog Source” category. This monaural tabletop radio was shockingly good at locking in tightly spaced signals and pulling in low-power college stations—a cell phone chip provided the ultra-sensitive reception—that hi-fi geeks patched its stereo signal through the preamp of their pricy rack rigs, and used the thing as a bargain-basement tuner. recommends 2017 Tivoli Audio Model One Digital 7/10 Wired This digital refresh of the classic Tivoli Model One radio pumps out a lot of dBs with …

View Post

Samsung’s New Quantum Dots Serve Up Some Tasty TV Colors

In Business, Emerging Technology, Mobile Technology by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , ,

The television business is enjoying a platinum age. I don’t mean the content, although that’s great, too. I’m talking about the hardware. Everywhere you look, another manufacturer places another bet on the technology it insists provides the best picture. With 4K resolution, HDR video, and quantum dots hitting mainstream sets, you don’t lack for options. Right now, LG’s amazing OLED sets are widely considered the sets to beat. No LCD panel can match their contrast, because every pixel on an OLED screen can be individually controlled. Ink-black pixels cozy up alongside retina-searing colors with pin-sharp distinction. But Samsung and Sony claim their high-end LCD panels already beat OLED, especially if HDR video is your thing. Sony uses sophisticated image processing, crazy-bright panels, and a …

View Post

Stunning Aerial Captures 1,000 Migrating Geese From Above

In Education, Government by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: ,

If you find the graceful choreography of birds in flight mesmerizing from the ground, Jassen Todorov says you should see it from the air. “It’s fascinating,” he says. “They have this sense of orientation that’s just fabulous—thousands of them flying right next to each other and they never bump into each other, in perfect coordination.” Todorov has taken more than 1,000 aerial photos of birds in the past year or so. He made this one, of snow geese over the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, near San Francisco last month. He makes regular flights over the wetlands during the winter migration, snapping pictures from the window of his 1976 Piper Warrior. He started flying about 15 years ago, about the same time he got into photography. Todorov, …

View Post

What if Quantum Computers Used Hard Drives Made of DNA?

In Business, Education, Emerging Technology, Energy, Events, Government, Legal, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , ,

You’ve heard the hype: The quantum computer revolution is coming. Physicists say these devices will be fast enough to break every encryption method banks use today. Their artificial intelligence will be so advanced that you could load in the periodic table and the laws of quantum mechanics, and they could design the most efficient solar cell to date. And they’ll be here soon: Writing in Nature earlier this month, Google researchers said they anticipate the first commercial quantum computers in five years, and the company wants to build and test a 49-qubit—that’s “quantum bit”—quantum computer by the end of this year. Some experts say that a 50-qubit computer could outperform any conventional computer. But there’s a big problem: By its …

View Post
Number of Items Identified: 8
Item #Item NameScoreItem Classification
1intersection0.644junction, intersection
2junction0.667
3sidewalk0.63
4gray color0.818
5azure color0.657

The Great Lie of American Flood Risk

In Business, Events, Government, Legal, Science & Nature by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , ,

Millions of Americans are living a lie. You might be one of them: The homeowners who live near a flooding California river, the landlords in a slowly subsiding Southern city, or the business operators on a shoreline inundated a Nor’Easter’s storm surge. And all around the country, the federal government is dramatically undervaluing the risk of flooding to their homes or businesses. The lie originates from the National Flood Insurance Program, which sets rates for 5 million people living in flood-prone areas—based on flood projections that are sometimes decades out of date. Even when the projections are updated, the program lets people pay the old, underpriced insurance rates. That’s left the program $24 billion in debt, running an annual deficit …

View Post

Intel’s 15 Billion Reasons Why an AI Chip Revolution Has Arrived

In Business, Emerging Technology, Healthcare by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , ,

AI isn’t just changing internet services, cars, robotics, and healthcare. It’s changing the computer chip market too. This shift was underlined on Monday when Intel said it would pay $15.3 billion to acquire Mobileye, an Israeli company that makes chips and cameras for cars and trucks, including the self-driving variety. The purchase will be Intel’s second largest ever, following its $16.7 billion billion acquisition of chip-maker Altera in 2015. The Altera buy was also driven, in part, by the recent rise of machine learning, where machine learn can discrete tasks on their own. These are enormous acquisitions in many respects. After acquiring Mobileye, Intel will move its autonomous driving team to the Mobileye’s headquarters, not vice versa. In other words, …

View Post

Convicted CIA Leaker John Kiriakou’s Got Some Opinions About WikiLeaks and Trump

In Business, Events, Government, Healthcare, Legal, Security by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords: , , , , , , ,

John Kiriakou knows a lot about leaking classified information. He went to prison for it. A former CIA agent who said too much about the Bush-era torture program, he’s also the first CIA leaker to go to jail for his trouble. Kiriakou served just under two years in federal prison, though before the Department of Justice offered a plea deal, it seemed more likely he’d serve as many as 45. History has frowned on the “enhanced interrogation techniques” Kiriakou helped expose, but he’s still a controversial guy. Leakers usually are. They operate in gray areas. Kiriakou isn’t a cheering squad for loose-lipped aides and intelligence agents everywhere, but does see whistleblowing as essential. He’s critical of the way the CIA …

View Post

Enter the 9,000-Degree Hell That Melts 2 Million Tons of Steel a Year

In Energy by Wired NewsLeave a Comment

Tech News Keywords:

If hell exists, it might just resemble the enormous blast furnaces at TimkenSteel that turns two million tons of junked cars, old appliances, and other scrap into new steel. The factory is bathed in a red glow, and molten steel bubbles in giant cauldrons. “It was pretty mindblowing,” says photographer Ricky Rhodes. “It gets really bright and hot. You have to literally move away because you feel like you’re melting.” Rhodes grew up in Cleveland, Ohio, in the heart of the rust belt but never saw the inside of a steel factory until TimkenSteel invited him in three years ago. The company has been producing steel for 100 years, and its three factories in nearby Canton produces two million tons of steel each …